Fire Prevention

Fire is an excellent servant…but a poor master. Now is a good time to review a few common-sense precautions that can reduce the threat of fire in your home. Be sure to post the ABCs of fire safety where all members of your household can refer to it easily.

In Case of Fire – Get out! Stay out!
Break the Fire Triangle
Fire-Extinguishers
Fire Safety Tips
Maintain Smoke Alarms
Plan Your Exit
How Fire-Conscious are You? How Safe is Your Home?
Heating and Cooking
Electrical and Mechanical Equipment
Fuels, Solvents and Other Flammable Materials
Apartments and Fire
Careless Smoking


In Case of Fire – Get out! Stay out!


If you smell smoke or see flames, get everyone out of the building immediately.

Call the Fire Department!

Don’t Fight Fire..

If Your Clothes Catch Fire…

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Break the Fire Triangle
Most fires need heat, oxygen, and fuel. Break the triangle at any point and you’ll extinguish the fire.

  1. Cooling removes heat.
  2. Smothering removes oxygen.
  3. Relocating combustible material removes fuel.

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Fire-Extinguishers
Fire extinguishers can save lives and property by putting out a small fire or containing it until firefighters arrive. Before you begin to fight a small fire, make sure that everyone is leaving the building and that the fire department has been called. If your escape route could be blocked, get out!

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Your fire extinguisher must fit the fire:

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Know the Fire-Extinguisher Password
PULL the pin

AIM low

SQUEEZE the handle

SWEEP from side to side, keeping the extinguisher aimed at the base of the fire.

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Safety Tips

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Maintain Smoke Alarms
Smoke detectors save lives; but a smoke alarm with a dead or missing battery, or one that is wired to a switched circuit, is worse than none at all – it builds a false sense of security. Smoke detectors should be installed outside bedrooms and on each additional level of the home, including the basement. Keep smoke detectors clear of dust, and never paint them. Don’t use rechargeable batteries; they can quit without warning!

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Plan Your Exit
Make an escape plan. Practice fire drills. Every member of your household – babysitters, too – should know the exits and how to use them. Remember, keys to double-cylinder door locks should be easily reached. Learn your fire-emergency telephone number; write it down near the telephone and, if your telephone is programmable, why not include 911 or your fire department? Give your fire department early warning! A small blaze can become a major fire in minutes. If seniors are often home alone, urge them to consider subscribing to an emergency alarm service.

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How Fire-Conscious are You? How Safe is Your Home?
Chances are that your “Home Sweet Home” could be a lot safer. Among the major causes of fatal fires in Canada are:

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Heating and Cooking

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Electrical and Mechanical Equipment

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Fuels, Solvents and Other Flammable Materials

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Apartments and Fire
There are some special fire-protection do’s and don’ts in apartment buildings. All tenants have a duty to keep stairways clear and emergency exits unblocked. Never use an elevator during a fire; the elevator shafts can become full of hot gasses, like chimney flues – and the elevator controls can quit or malfunction. Or the doors could open onto a hall full of flame and smoke.

Know where the fire alarms are and learn the locations of fire extinguishers and hoses. Never toss a lighted cigarette from a balcony; it could blow in an open window below. And never barbecue on a balcony; it’s too dangerous.

If there’s a fire, feel the hall door before opening it; if it’s hot, leave it shut. If smoke is entering under the door, plug the gap with wet towels. And remember, because smoke usually rises, it may be easier to breathe at floor level, at an open window, or out on a balcony. If you do leave the apartment, be sure to close the door behind you, and leave windows closed, too.

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